December 11, 2018, 13:05:12

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Author Topic: frag tanks  (Read 748 times)

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Offline crankbait09

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frag tanks
« on: November 06, 2018, 12:56:26 »
For those of you that have separate frag tanks from your DT.
How do you maintain this separate tank?  Meaning, do you have a skimmer, sump, and all the other equipment your DT tank has in order to keep it going?
Do you have these frag tanks without the skimmer/sump?
Mind sharing your set up and how you're doing it?

I've thought of having a separate tank for my accidental frags, or frags that I want to move out of the DT (less clutter).  But not sure how much effort that would end up being. other than a light

Offline crankbait09

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Re: frag tanks
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2018, 13:36:19 »
Let me reword this and see what kind of response I get.

From what I can tell, this can be done easily with a 20g long tank (bare bottom), powerhead (30-50x total volume), heater, light, and a frag rack.
Not sure if live rock/HOB filter is needed
I see some people say to add at least one fish, but I'm still debating that one.
Skimmer isn't needed.
I would need to do weekly water changes (10-15%), top off the water, and test as needed.

Does anyone see any downside to this or possibly any issues I am overlooking?

Offline Humphrey

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Re: frag tanks
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2018, 18:15:33 »
I would do small hang on back filter.  Put some filter media in your display for a couple weeks to seed bacteria then into the hang on back. This way you have something you can run a little carbon and perhaps GFO over time.  Then you wonít need to do as frequent water changes. Iíd do a small algae eater like a Blenny. Maybe a pest eater like a sapphire damsel.

Some do Mollyís adapted to salt but Iíve never had any luck. They have them at gerbers. You wouldnít have to do fish but it might help the tank mature faster. I have also done sand and/or rock under the racks if you have some. May speed up the maturation but not required in my view.

Offline joelbegt

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Re: frag tanks
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2018, 19:11:55 »
I think your answer depends heavily on the type of corals you put in it.  If you have fish or pack it with a lot of hard corals you will have more maintenance.  If I was setting up a small frag tank I would go with an aquaclear hob filter converted to a refugium with cheato, a pump, a light, and a heater, and maybe a fist size chunk of established LR

Offline crankbait09

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Re: frag tanks
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2018, 19:23:29 »
I guess I should answer with a bit more detail as well as the intentions of the tank.

This tank will be nothing more than a temporary holding spot of frags, till I either sell or trade them. The tank will remain up and running for as long as I have frags.

Which Is why I'm thinking easy and less maintenance

Offline Reeferntraining

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Re: frag tanks
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2018, 19:32:37 »
Just my experience, but smaller tanks were hard to keep stable.

 

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